Event & Research Paper: “Retribution vs Restoration” Symposium

Our first symposium of the year Check out the photos from the Access Team’s first symposium of the year, “Retribution vs Restoration: What is the future of the prison system in New Zealand?” It was so popular we had attendees standing at the back! Thank you all for attending, including above all our very lively panel, which featured Justice Whata …

Amicus Curiae: How Could New Zealand’s Tax System Promote Social Justice?

By James Adams Our country’s tax system raised about $80 billion last year for the government to spend on improving the living standards of New Zealanders. However, tax can be more than merely a way to raise revenue: it can also be used to promote social justice and other policy outcomes through its design. For example, the progressive nature of …

Amicus Curaie: Social Media and the Cost of Privacy

By Patricia Lu Social media platforms and the privilege they have over our data is the elephant in the room that’s finally being talked about. With the Cambridge Analytica scandal and the commencement of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in Europe on May 25, it is important to understand the extent of how our privacy is being used for …

The Windrush Scandal – Institutional Racism Married with Decades of Governmental Error

By Milly Sheed The Windrush scandal – a political blunder that hit the United Kingdom only a few weeks ago – has forced the British government to apologise and compensate for the unlawful refusal-of-entry, detainment and deportation of descendants of the Windrush generation immigrant workers. The scandal has sparked national and international debate about the immigration status of those who …

Cross-Examination: Modern Slavery and Fast Fashion, a Match Made in Heaven?

By Haya Khan The legend goes that for every $400 Gucci design, there will be a version of it available to you for the affordable price of $14.99. As University students, struggling graduates, new parents, or people from any other walk of life, it is not easy to purchase from a higher-end price range that guarantee ethical production of clothes …

Amicus Curiae: Exploitation or Ejection: The Legal Status of Migrant Sex Workers

By Amy Dresser Immigration New Zealand recently made the news for including, and then excluding, sex work on a skilled employment list. However, this sheds light on the bigger issue regarding the legal protection of sex workers on temporary work visas in New Zealand. Legal status of sex workers in New Zealand Sex work was legalised by the Prostitution Reform …

Cross-Examination: The Housing Crisis in Auckland: A Discussion

By Katrina De Joya In recent years, there has been increasing concern about the decline of affordable residential housing in Auckland. Homeownership has been at its lowest level in 66 years.[1] In 2013, 65% of individuals owned a home, the lowest it has been since 1953.[2] As prices for homes keep increasing, the Kiwi Dream of homeownership seems to be …

Amicus Curaie: Online Media and the Omnipresent Clickbait Issue

By Georgia Osmond It is universally acknowledged that the media plays a crucial role in many Western democracies. Known as the ‘fourth estate’, its role is to hold government, the courts and other public bodies to account, and provide the public with access to information they may not normally be able to access. Media publishers are given certain privileges that …

Amicus Curiae: The Pandora’s Box: Reforming the Official Information Act

By Ben Bowley-Drinnan Information is arguably a necessity of life, as it informs our every action. That is why the statement “Information is power” exists. Furthermore, if there is to be effective accountability of those in power, official information is a valuable tool, as it allows discussion of actions and justifications for those actions to be understood. The Official Information …

Cross-Examination: The Fault in Our Funded Family Care Policy: Why New Zealand should reform how family carers of disabled New Zealanders are compensated

By Lauren White The Government has been sending mixed signals to the international community. On one hand, they have ratified the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, displaying a commitment to preserving the rights of New Zealanders who live with disabilities. On the other hand, ahead of their periodic report on New Zealand, the UN have …