Cross-Examination: New Zealand’s Questionable Commitment to Refugee Settlement

Ari Apa, Content Contributor Earlier this year, New Zealand’s Race Relations Commissioner Dame Susan Devoy spoke out about New Zealand’s minimal efforts to alleviate the current global refugee crisis.[1] New Zealand is a signatory to the 1951 Convention on the Status of Refugees. New Zealand has assented to be bound by the Convention, and had adopted the principles underpinning the …

Cross-Examination: An Impossible Choice – ‘Seales v Attorney-General’

Lecretia Seales’ application to the High Court for declarations stating that her physician was able to assist her, as an individual facing an incurable and intolerable terminal disease, to end her life is the latest in a large number of assisted suicide cases to have come before the common law courts in recent years. Today, Communications Co-Manager Sebastian Hartley provides an in-depth analysis of …

Cross-Examination: Building on Shaky Ground? – The Christchurch Rebuild and Migrant Workers’ Rights

Lydia Buckley, Content Contributor Recently, the Government made the decision to relax some of our immigration laws with the purpose of allowing more workers from overseas to assist with the rebuild of Christchurch following the devastating earthquakes of 2011.[1] Four years on, crumbling buildings and construction tape still disfigure the CBD and the Government argues that there are simply not …

Cross-Examination: The Arbitration Game – The TPPA and Investor State Dispute Resolution

In the second article of our two-part series on the effects of a Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement on social justice in New Zealand, EJP today explores the impact of the proposed Investor-to-State Dispute Resolution provisions in the draft TPPA. James Peacock asks whether these provisions, which will effectively give companies in TPPA-party states the ability to sue the New Zealand government for harming their interests, will negatively impact on …

Cross-Examination: Dead on Arrival? – The TPPA and Equal Access to Medicine

Today, in the first of a two-part series on the potential implications of the proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement on equality in New Zealand, EJP explores the impact of the Agreement on access to medicine. Will proposed intellectual property protections in the Agreement hamper the ability of Pharmac to procure medicines as cheaply as it does at the moment? Will this result in subsidies falling; ultimately reducing equality …

Cross-Examination: The Right to Die in New Zealand

Pooja Upadhyay Our right to life is enshrined in the fabric of New Zealand society through legislation such as the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990.[1] However, our right to death can be seen as non-existent or inaccessible to all. The autonomy to choose when and how to die when suffering intolerably from a terminal disease is not granted …

Cross-Examination: Abortion Law Reform in New Zealand

The Equal Justice Project is a strictly apolitical organisation. We are committed to giving equal expression to, and providing fair critique of, all ideologies and viewpoints. Accordingly, in preparing this article we contacted all parliamentary parties, ALRANZ, Family First New Zealand, Pro-Life New Zealand, and the University of Auckland Campus Feminist Collective for comment; believing these groups to represent, between them, a wide range …

Cross-Examination: Drinking While Pregnant – A Woman’s Choice?

Chantelle Murray On the night of March 17 2015, a 36 week pregnant woman went out to dinner with her husband.[1] When asking for a glass of wine she was refused service and instead offered a complimentary ginger beer. Nichola Hayes said she felt “completely flabbergasted and embarrassed” at this treatment.[2] Her argument was that she was a well-educated woman who …

Cross-Examination: ‘I Too, Deserve an Education’ – UTAS and Affirmative Action in Tertiary Education

YE LIN KO Recently, there have been debates regarding alternative schemes that help minority groups in universities throughout New Zealand.[1] The main issue is whether these alternative programs — such as the Undergraduate Targeted Admission Scheme (UTAS) — reflect or breach affirmative action.[2] Does providing extra assistance to those less fortunate reflect equality or equity or both? Or do these …