Cross-Examination: How Universal is ACC?

James Peacock, content contributor The Accident Compensation Commission was established in New Zealand in 1974 pursuant to the Accident Compensation Act 1972 with the purpose of  better facilitating“the rehabilitation and compensation of persons who suffer personal injury”. [1] In effect, the ACC scheme was created to act as a safety net to compensate those who injured themselves either at work …

Cross-Examination: How Discrimination Impacts Mental Health Recovery

Chantelle Murray, content contributor Mental illness affects 1 in 5 Kiwis every year. However, many New Zealanders living with mental illness suffer from unfair discrimination.[1] A 2014 Health Promotional Agency (HPA) survey posed the following question to 2500 respondents: “You are a member of a local sports club. A new person wants to join the club. You know they have …

An OIA A Day Keeps Dictators Away: Freedom of Information and the State’s Accountability

Jack Garden, Content Contributor Politicians have long understood the crucial link between controlling the flow of official information and maintaining control of the government benches. Ministers who can sweep under the carpet documents detailing extravagant public sector purchases or failed million-dollar projects can convince citizens of their competency when the reality is the opposite. Armed with official documents, individuals and …

Cross-Examination: Trustee Issues – Balancing School Discipline and Fair Treatment

Ye Lin Ko, content contributor All New Zealand state and state-integrated schools have a board of trustees.[1] The members of the board, which include individuals elected from the school’s community, play a crucial role in managing and organising the school. This involves setting the appropriate educational goals and strategic direction of the school. The board works closely with the school’s …

Cross-Examination: Is our democracy in trouble? Public trust in politicians and news media

Lydia Buckley, Content Contributor Politicians are sometimes associated with shady dealings, broken promises, deceit and propaganda. Regardless of whether this stereotype is accurate or not, it is one that is commonly held by the public. In fact, a recent survey prepared by Research New Zealand ranked politicians as the second least trusted occupation by the New Zealand public.[1] A glance …

Cross-Examination: New Zealand’s Child Poverty Problem

Ari Apa, content contributor In 1978 New Zealand signed up to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCROC), which requires the State to protect children’s rights to social security and standards of living adequate for their mental, spiritual, moral and social development.[1] This is a binding legal obligation, which not only guarantees the provision of adequate …

Cross-Examination: Locked out of the Conversation – The Consequences of Depriving Prisoners of Voting Rights

Jade Du Preez, content contributor The New Zealand prison system has come under criticism with the recent release of a UN Report from the Committee against Torture.[1] The report comes from a body of independent experts monitoring compliance with the provisions of the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment. Highlighted were concerns over Māori …

Cross-Examination: An Obsolete Status Quo – Does Religion Still Have A Place in New Zealand Schools?

Jess Fitzgerald, content contributor The recent media attention concerning Jeff McClintock’s High Court action against the Attorney General and his daughter’s Hibiscus Coast school has reignited debate over a complex issue sensitive to many New Zealanders: the place (if any) that religion should command in our schools. Religion has always been a fundamental aspect of New Zealand schools’ curriculum — …

Cross-Examination: The Unintended Consequences of the Harmful Digital Communications Act

Daniel Gambitsis, content contributor On 30 June the Harmful Digital Communications Act (HDC) passed its third and final reading. The highly controversial Act seeks to ‘deter, prevent, and mitigate’ online bullying and harassment and provide victims with a means of redress.[1] There is indubitably a crisis of online bullying and harassment in New Zealand, the online dimension to a widespread …