Putting New Zealand’s Meth Addiction Under the Microscope

By Claudia Russell   New Zealand’s talent for drug making has grown out of distance and necessity. Surrounded by oceans, our geographic isolation and tough border controls have forced us to be innovative. Combine this with the ease with which methamphetamine can be produced from readily available materials, and you have the perfect conditions for a nationwide meth problem.[1] There …

Cross Examination: Withdrawal of Life Support Without Parental Permission?

BY HANNAH YANG The issue of withdrawing life support from a child against parents’ wishes is one ileich has come under public scrutiny recently in the UK, with media closely following the case of Charlie Gard, an infant who suffers from a fatal and incurable disease. The case attracted much public controversy and after much attention on social media, ultimately …

POLITICS WEEK: Boot Camps for Young Offenders?

By Anonymous On the 13th August, the National party revealed its plan for serious young offenders if re-elected. While New Zealand’s youth justice system has been relatively successful, with youth conviction rates down by 45% since 2011,[1] National says this new policy is to keep the New Zealand public safe by cracking down on “a small group of 150 young …

POLITICS WEEK: Protector or Persecutor? An Inquiry into State Care Child Abuse

By Janna Tay Between the 1950s and 1980s, the New Zealand government placed more than 100,000 children in state care.[1] Supposedly rescued from broken family situations as a protective measure, these children then experienced physical and psychological abuse in their new homes due to failures in government oversight.[2] They suffer the repercussions to this day, and often fall into groups …

POLITICS WEEK: Māori Incarceration Rates and Māori-Only Prisons?

BY ALEX SIMS Māori currently make up 51 percent of our prison population, however only 14.6 percent of the population in New Zealand are Māori.[1] With this year’s election fast approaching, it is an important time for us to consider why New Zealand’s Māori prison population is at an all-time high. Māori currently make up a higher percentage of all …

POLITICS WEEK: Issues of Consent – “Stealthing”

By Alex Cranstoun Stealthing is the deliberate removal of a condom without a partner’s consent or knowledge during sexual intercourse.[1] Although the practice is not a new concept, it has recently been brought into notoriety by a Swiss criminal case and a study by Yale Law School graduate, Alexandra Brodsky.[2] These two reports have caused various jurisdictions to question the …

Cross-Examination: Transgender Personnel in the Armed Forces

BY ALEX CRANSTOUN The palindrome of blue and pink stripes with a central white line in the transgender flag means that it is impossible to fly the flag incorrectly. This is analogous to the view that there is no right or wrong approach to gender. The LGBT+ community has struggled to gain the same rights and privileges of the wider …

Cross Examination: Andrew Little & New Zealand’s Defamation Laws

BY HANNAH YANG The reach of qualified privilege as a defence to a defamation claim and the conflict between free speech and personal reputation has recently come under scrutiny by the courts once again. In Hagaman v Little, or the Andrew Little defamation case, as it is more popularly known, Clark J ruled that comments made by a person in …

Law Students: the Silent Struggle with Mental Health and Wellbeing

By Haya Khan ‘Wellbeing Warriors’ is one of the multiple mental health groups from the University of Auckland. The Warriors aim to promote positive discussion around issues of mental health and spread awareness by creating an inclusive atmosphere within law school. In doing so, they hope to lower stress levels and anxieties that are rarely discussed but which are collectively …