Amicus Curiae: Exploitation or Ejection: The Legal Status of Migrant Sex Workers

By Amy Dresser Immigration New Zealand recently made the news for including, and then excluding, sex work on a skilled employment list. However, this sheds light on the bigger issue regarding the legal protection of sex workers on temporary work visas in New Zealand. Legal status of sex workers in New Zealand Sex work was legalised by the Prostitution Reform …

Amicus Curaie: Online Media and the Omnipresent Clickbait Issue

By Georgia Osmond It is universally acknowledged that the media plays a crucial role in many Western democracies. Known as the ‘fourth estate’, its role is to hold government, the courts and other public bodies to account, and provide the public with access to information they may not normally be able to access. Media publishers are given certain privileges that …

Amicus Curiae: The Pandora’s Box: Reforming the Official Information Act

By Ben Bowley-Drinnan Information is arguably a necessity of life, as it informs our every action. That is why the statement “Information is power” exists. Furthermore, if there is to be effective accountability of those in power, official information is a valuable tool, as it allows discussion of actions and justifications for those actions to be understood. The Official Information …

Amicus: Syrian Airstrikes and the Fragility of International Law

By Haya Khan Saviour in the Aggressor’s cloak? If by any chance you’ve been living under some magical rock where you’ve been able to avoid all 2018 has to offer, such as Fortnite, the yodelling kid and US launching airstrikes on Syria for the use of chemical weapons on Syrian civilians, let’s talk. No, World War Three hasn’t started but …

Amicus: Why the Mega-Prison Won’t Work

By Valeeria Slaiman The New Zealand government is on the verge of making a decision that may potentially lead to the further detriment of the criminal justice system. The former National government instigated plans to build a mega prison in Waikato, this being the biggest prison that New Zealand has ever seen, accommodating 3000 inmates. With Labour now in office, …

Amicus Curiae: Endometriosis: The Hidden Epidemic – a dire need for funding in New Zealand?

By Milly Sheed Endometriosis: an exclusively female disease that we as a country know virtually nothing about. Affecting 1 in 10 women, endometriosis is a chronic gynaecological condition that is, as yet, incurable. With unacceptable diagnosis times, limited and invasive treatments and minimal knowledge on where it even comes from, women across New Zealand continue to battle the detrimental affects …

Amicus: The Changing State of Rights in New Zealand

By Rachel Buckman Should prisoners have the right to vote? A controversial question, and one that has circulated in public discussion ever since a blanket ban was enacted in 2010. Perhaps the change would have faded into the legislative background if it were not for the legal battle that followed. A group of prisoners, including ‘jailhouse lawyer’ Arthur Taylor, challenged …

Amicus Curiae: The 1.5 Generation and Asian Political Representation

By Janna Tay Whenever we are in a crowd or watching a show, someone in our group inevitably asks, ‘Where are the Asians?’, and so it was with the Labour campaign launch at the Auckland Town Hall in late August. It’s one thing to ask this question for mainstream TV shows or in Asian fusion eateries in Ponsonby, but it’s …

Amicus Curiae: Accessibility Legislation Would Be a ‘Win-Win’ For Everybody

BY CLAUDIA RUSSELL Accessibility legislation could be a ‘win-win’ for employers and people with disabilities. A recent national poll has revealed mass support for accessibility legislation. 80% of respondents said they support the introduction of minimum standards for disability access. Shockingly, New Zealand currently has no formal standards for building and transport accessibility. In conversation with Radio New Zealand, spokesperson …