EJP Outreach Euthanasia Symposium Paper

Click here to view the Euthanasia Symposium Paper. The euthanasia debate has been ignited following Lecretia Seales’ public plight to clarify the state of New Zealand’s law on euthanasia. In June of 2015, the High Court ruled that medical assistance to help Ms Seales die at a time of her own choosing would be against the current law, and that …

Applications for EJP Director 2016 Now Open

Are you passionate about social justice? Are you organised and have a vision for how the Equal Justice Project can be bigger and better than ever? Apply to be a 2016 EJP Director! We are currently taking applications for a new EJP director for 2016. You can apply for the position using the form below. The EJP Director role involves …

The 2015 Equal Justice Project Hui

As law students, our greatest assets are our idealism, energy, and passion for making a positive difference in people’s lives. However, given the nature of law school and the constant grind of assignments and tests, it can be easy to lose sight of why we chose to be a part of the work that the Equal Justice Project does to …

Audiovisual Recordings: EJP Miscarriages of Justice Symposium

In recent years, New Zealand’s attention has turned towards the reality that there are innocent people in our prisons. Though Mark Lundy’s conviction has now been confirmed, the exoneration of David Bain and Teina Pora reminds us that there our prosecution, trial, conviction, and appeal processes lead to injustices. Following these high-profile proceedings, the Equal Justice Project’s Outreach team was delighted to welcome …

Exclusive Interview with Jan Logie MP on Abortion Law Reform

EDITORIAL NOTE: In preparing her recent article on abortion law reform (available to view here), EJP Content Contributor Rebecca Hallas had the opportunity to interview Jan Logie MP regarding the Green Party’s policy on abortion. Released in the build up to the 2014 election, the Greens’ policy was met with fierce criticism by opponents of liberalised abortion laws. The full text of …

Letting the few decide for the many: the latest euthanasia bill

BY JASPER LAU The current euthanasia debate in New Zealand began in 2015, following Lecretia Seales’ public plight to clarify the state of New Zealand’s law on euthanasia after her brain tumour became terminal. Lecretia applied to the High Court to ask whether she had the option of having a doctor’s help to die if her suffering became intolerable. In …

Double trouble? The risk of private prosecutions

BY CHRIS RYAN Private prosecutions are a rare feature of New Zealand’s criminal justice system. Private prosecutions are prosecutions started by private individuals, rather than the police or other prosecuting authorities. However, a Court decision in March 2016 has the potential to support an increased number of private prosecutions. The Court of Appeal upheld Tamsin Trainor’s private prosecution against Neihana …

Cross-Examination: The Universal Basic Income – A Step on the Road to Serfdom?

BY JASPER LAU In the past couple of years in New Zealand, there has been growing calls for the introduction of a form of universal basic income to be implemented in New Zealand. With a study conducted by Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand finding that up to 46% of current New Zealand jobs (885,000) are at a risk of …

Amicus Curiae: Police, Anti-Depressants, and Mental Health – Have We Missed the Point?

By Sabrina Sachs Controversy has been swirling around recent police policy not to allow new recruits based on their use of anti-depressant medication. Are people on anti-depressants stable enough to be on the police force? Is it unethical to exclude these people from serving? Some will argue that to allow people on these types of medication serve on the police …

Exclusive Interview with Gareth Hughes on the Green Party’s Public Journalism Fund Proposal

Claudia Russell discusses solutions with Gareth Hughes and explores the Green Party’s latest proposal. Journalism in New Zealand is becoming an industry marked by desperation. News headlines are growing increasingly trivial, and ‘fake news’ has become the phrase of the year. In a changing industry increasingly dominated by global giants such as Google and Facebook, our media organizations are struggling …

Cross-Examination: Motels Replacing State Homes?

BY SABRINA SACHS Housing has reached crisis point in this country. New Zealand and its people stand at a crossroads; do we continue business as usual (with a few minor adjustments), or do we take a stand against the blatant disregard for our rights to shelter and housing? The situation is one where housing prices are increasingly rising, wages are …

Amicus Curiae: Blind Justice: Does Morality Have a Role in Law?

BY ALEX CRANSTOUN When I think of the law, Lady Justice comes to mind, tall, foreboding and blind to the differences of those brought before her. Equality before the law is a staple of legal systems in the Western world. But is that really what we want? Do we want a regimented formula applied to every person who commits the …

EJP Access Neurodisability and Therapeutic Jurisprudence

Approximately one in four New Zealanders are limited by a physical, sensory, learning mental health or other impairment. People affected by neurodisabilities are placed in an extremely vulnerable situation when they come into contact with the justice system. As a result, neurodisability has become a complex issue for New Zealand’s criminal justice system, and is an issue of growing concern due …

Amicus Curiae: No Way to Minimum Wage? The Case for a Living Wage in New Zealand

By Haya Khan It’s safe to say employment options are limited for a university student. Adjusting a part time job into a hectic university schedule, exams, socialising and mandatory Netflix weekend binge-watching can take a toll on work ethic and mental health. So, for all the effort a full-time university student puts into their part time job, is minimum wage truly …